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Devine Kennels

German Shepherds

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For nobility of character, purpose, and appearance, few animals can surpass the German Shepherd Dog. This breed's courage, steadfast heart, and keen senses have endeared him to mankind. They make wonderful companions. He is active, but dignified, and will delight in joining you in fishing, swimming, or hiking. He's very fond of children once he gets to know them.

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One of our German's Showing off their herding ability

Did you know?

On April 22, 1899, the German Captain Max von Stephanitz founded the Verein fur Deutsche Schaferhunde (SV), the first parent club of the breed now known as the German Shepherd Dog.

The first German Shepherd Dog registered with the American Kennel Club was Queen of Switzerland (in 1908), who was shown in competition in New York that same year.

The German Shepherd Dog Club of America's first specialty took place in Greenwich, Connecticut, on June 11, 1913.

So you want to own a German Shepherd Dog?

The German Shepherd Dog is known throughout the world for his uncanny intelligence and faithfulness. This versatile breed has well-earned the reputation as family companion, guide dog, police dog, and, of course, herder.

The German Shepherd Dog is an excellent house-dog, but if you live in an apartment or a small house you will need to give your dog
daily exercise.

They are excellent travelers and love to ride in the car for long trips. They are truly a companion and can be taken everywhere - fishing, swimming, boating, hiking, etc.

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Breed Standard

General Appearance
The first impression of a good German Shepherd Dog is that of a strong, agile, well muscled animal, alert and full of life. It is well balanced, with harmonious development of the forequarter and hindquarter. The dog is longer than tall, deep-bodied, and presents an outline of smooth curves rather than angles. It looks substantial and not spindly, giving the impression, both at rest and in motion, of muscular fitness and nimbleness without any look of clumsiness or soft living. The ideal dog is stamped with a look of quality and nobility--difficult to define, but unmistakable when present. Secondary sex characteristics are strongly marked, and every animal gives a definite impression of masculinity or femininity, according to its sex.

Temperament
The breed has a distinct personality marked by direct and fearless, but not hostile, expression, self-confidence and a certain aloofness that does not lend itself to immediate and indiscriminate friendships. The dog must be approachable, quietly standing its ground and showing confidence and willingness to meet overtures without itself making them. It is poised, but when the occasion demands, eager and alert; both fit and willing to serve in its capacity as companion, watchdog, blind leader, herding dog, or guardian, whichever the circumstances may demand. The dog must not be timid, shrinking behind its master or handler; it should not be nervous, looking about or upward with anxious expression or showing nervous reactions, such as tucking of tail, to strange sounds or sights. Lack of confidence under any surroundings is not typical of good character. Any of the above deficiencies in character which indicate shyness must be penalized as very serious faults and any dog exhibiting pronounced indications of these must be excused from the ring. It must be possible for the judge to observe the teeth and to determine that both testicles are descended. Any dog that attempts to bite the judge must be disqualified. The ideal dog is a working animal with an incorruptible character combined with body and gait suitable for the arduous work that constitutes its primary purpose.

Size, Proportion, Substance
The desired height for males at the top of the highest point of the shoulder blade is 24 to 26 inches; and for bitches, 22 to 24 inches.

The German Shepherd Dog is longer than tall, with the most desirable proportion as 10 to 8. The length is measured from the point of the prosternum or breastbone to the rear edge of the pelvis, the ischial tuberosity. The desirable long proportion is not derived from a long back, but from overall length with relation to height, which is achieved by length of forequarter and length of withers and hindquarter, viewed from the side.